Lemon Curry Corn Chowder: The Actual Recipe

Base:

Melt 2 Tablespoons of butter, 3 – 4 drops of liquid smoke and a couple lugs of olive oil on super low while you cut up the beginning of your base.

Mince two gloves of garlic and half of a jalapeno. Dice 1/4 red onion and 1/4 yellow onion, half a red pepper and two small carrots. Add that to the butter and oil, keep on super low so you don’t feel rushed. Stir around super good. Add a little bit of thyme so it starts to smell like you know what you’re doing.

While the base is starting up, cut up half a sweet potato and start to husk your corn.

When the corn is husked, go and add about a tablespoon of yellow curry  and the sweet potato into your base and let it mix well. Let that warm all together. It should taste really good and be encouraging. Add a little white wine if it looks at all dry. Or broth or water.

Shave the corn off the husk with a sharp knife and put it in a big bowl. Put a splash of chardonnay and a pad of butter and 2 tsp of celery salt in with the corn and mix. I was wanting the butter to coat the corn and have it somewhat evenly coated.

From there, put the corn in with the base and add a cup of water. Keep on low and preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Put a cast iron skillet with some olive oil in while it preheats.

Potatoes:

With the oven preheating, cut up 2 yukon gold potatoes and 3 – 5 smaller red potatoes. I just kept cutting till they were bite sized. I’m sure professionals have a word for this. Toss those with 2 – 4 tsp thyme,  1 tsp of cinnamon and a little liquid smoke, a splash of wine or oil, some lemon juice, and coat them.

Once the oven is preheated, your base is still on low, put the potatoes in the skillet. Roast them until they are some what cooked and some are brown. The salt in your chowder will come from the potatoes so salt generously to aide in their roasting and flavor the chowder.

I was tempted to go longer and fully roast, but wasn’t sure about that in the chowder. Looking back, it probably would have been even more delicious to do so. Feel free to try that and let me know how it goes.

Once the potatoes are cooked up, add 3 cups of broth (veg or chicken) and 1 cup of white wine to the base, add the potatoes to the base, squeeze a half of lemon into the base and bring to a bowl. Lid it and let it simmer for 10 – 20.

Do a couple of taste tests by dipping some favorite bread in the chowder. Season more or less to taste.. curry, cinnamon, salt, thyme, whatever you want more of… Let it simmer for 10 once you have the blend you want.

When you’re ready to serve it, take half and half (or cream cheese would work) and stir it in until it is as creamy as you’d like. I could have gone creamier, but wanted it to be a little on the lighter side. We garnished with some sliced jalapenos.

Just thought it would be so cool if my daughters made this someday :) who knows.

 

 

Lemon Curry Corn Chowder @ The Perfect Sunny Day – Bellingham

I am in the process of making what I am calling Lemon Curry Corn Chowder on one million percent the most gorgeous August day your heart can imagine. It’s about 68 degrees, perfectly sunny, and all doors open with birdsong a-go.

We have people in and out of our front yard picking up Facebook finds and Craigslist ads… it’s sad to see the kayak go, the house up here empty, etc but it’s exciting to see our petty cash bucket fill up and think about the things that we need slash want for our Webster house to take root.

Primarily a dishwasher, but – specifically a tv for David’s Saturday morning soccer – I mean football games, the lumber for our Urban Chestnut brewery inspired dining hall and two new black ceiling fans for me.

I am excited to get all the kids under one roof and be responsible for feeding them and telling them, lovingly and with big wide space for self-exploration, what to do.

I am eager to get school schedules and such together and start figuring out what that is going to look like. I am already planning a family friendly Avenger character development learning series and am thinking that I’ll do silent reading time where the readers get waited on hand and foot that flip flops with kitchen time where the young women in the making get taught basic cooking functions, how to be a generous spirit to others and how to – in general – not burn the house down. (Primarily taught by my own sharing how I leave the burner on and it drives David mad.)

The chowder is exploratory and the house smells delicious. I went to the co-op downtown Bellingham (which is in the top 5 of “Things I Will Miss”, without a doubt) and picked up $90 worth of local, organic cheese, fruits, veggies, bread and pork to make up a couple days worth of brioche french toast, chowder and oven friend pork chops.

<total side note – somebody just showed up for a deep freezer David listed for free on the internet and I should be helping but my moral compass won’t allow it – I wouldn’t have given that to Thanos. Gosh, with the Avenger lines. I can’t stop.>

Okay – so this is for sure part one of the chowder series.

Oh, the person was for the kayak. WOW. David’s fishing kayak is gone.

Chowder recipe so far:

Diced up 2 cloves of garlic, half a red pepper, 1/4 of a red onion, 1/4 yellow onion, 2 carrots and put on super low with some butter and olive oil.

Let that go while I cut up a small sweet potato. Added that in with a tablespoon of chardonnay and what looked like 2 teaspoons of yellow curry.

Stirred it up for a minute just to mix it well.

Let that go while I shaved 6 ears of corn on the cob. Mixed the shaved corn in a bowl with celery salt and a pad of room temperature butter and a tablespoon or so of seriously minced almost gone yellow onion.

that’s going now… official recipe will have to read “mix the corn in and let that simmer with a cup of water and juiced half lemon for the amount of time it takes to write a blog post and cut up the rest of the potatoes…”

More in a bit…

Nice Wide Turns @ David’s Office in Bellingham 8.4.20

Feeling compelled to write current thoughts after a lunch break comprised of kundalini yoga for the hips & a piece of sea salt caramel dark chocolate.

One of the main themes in my personal evolution is letting go of the need to address change in others. There are things I want our kids to learn (like cleaning up toothpaste on the counter or being considerate of what you leave in the sink) before they turn into college roommates.

Yet, the management of 5 project plans (one per kid) and the coordination of said plans with David layered by the actual household projects and pantry management on top of “work” work, desired creative bandwidth and personal time is just too much.

And… based on recent findings… unnecessary…

On my flight in on Sunday, I had just had one of those glorious crafty moments where I think of a game that is actually a great way to manipulate the kids into doing what I want them to do when I noticed how the plane was turning.

A nice, wide turn.

I felt the control of the plane, the perfect balance of steadiness and direction, and recalled this double stroller I had when Ellen and Lucy were little. It was a high end stroller, a gift from a wealthy aunt on my ex’s side, and it could turn – literally – on a dime.

Crowded zoo? #nobigdeal Packed Saturday market? #bringit The thing was engineered for quick control and change. The plane turned much differently than the stroller.

In my awareness of these two very different calculations of engineering, I realized the fault in my quirky little game that would trick all the kids into doing what I wanted. What I need to bring to this family is not control, it’s indeed a balance of steadiness and direction.

It’s a steady application of everything I am learning by allowing others their life.

Yesterday afternoon, David and I went walking in the park. I had thought a lot during the day of our household and how to set us up for healthy meals and virtual learning. I was excited to share slash just wanted to hear myself talk so I prefaced myself… I said, “Babe, I have been thinking about how I want to manage the household and I am going to tell you about it but don’t worry – you don’t have to have an opinion or feel any pressure to build on or expand the idea.”

He started to laugh. He was so grateful to know I just wanted to talk and he didn’t have to do the whole sharpen my iron thing. I have learned from experience, my zealousness and excitement can put undue pressure on his pscyhe… he ends up problem solving the thing I figured out… we get lost in words… I just wanted to talk to begin with, so this time? I released the valve right away.

After a brisk walk around the lake, pausing only once to social distance / check the view, we stopped by Whole Foods to pick up an order and David was growing hungry. I could tell because, when he is hungry, he exercises his world class ability to be mad at everything and mad at nothing at the exact same time.

I have learned to shoulder him, like how he shoulders me when I am tired and can’t think straight enough to sound anything other than curt.

His hunger also can invoke “hyper management protocol”. (I watch a lot of Avengers.) With the edge of his stomach somehow triggering a survival mindset, he will question  whether or not we need X or have Y, whether I have done X or if I know Y.

Historically speaking, I take this personally and feel a lot of pressure to know answers to all these questions. However – a key thing I have  learned is “No, babe” is the perfect answer and – most importantly – it is 100% rhetorical when he asks me “Now what, babe?” about things he knows I have never done before or places I have never been.

(PS: This is very much unlike when my children ask me where things are in CVS, like I work there.)

I have learned I do not need to take anything of the energetic imagination on; it is easier to smile, to be equally curious, to be kind, to continue.

I am not perfect at this. But I am prefacing and I am adjusting.

That turn into Sea Tac on the final descent was really fascinating to me. I have a feeling a lot of life is going to be served well by remembering the truth of staying steady and keeping my focus when maneuvering my proverbial plane.

With the kids, this looks like “invitational awareness” and tailored choices.

“Do you want to put away the clean dishes or do you want to wipe the table?”

“Feel this dough – it is so smooth!”

“Would you like to hang out with me and load the dishwasher or come in when I’m done and clean up the pots?”

“Next time you’re in the bathroom will you see how many things on the counter – toothpaste, trash, pants, nerf gun, gum wrapper, small plastic spider – are yours and see if you can count them up and then take care of your mess? Let me know if I can help you.”

Because I would be happy to.

I could tell them to do it, to fix it on a dime, but the nice, wide turn feels a lot more accommodating.

It also seems to make way for a lot more believable story as to how they became such a kind, helpful roommate.